Saving Our Avian Resources, SOAR is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1999 dedicated to saving our avian resources through raptor rehabilitation, education, and research. SOAR maintains all necessary US Fish & Wildlife Service and Iowa DNR permits to provide the rehabilitation and education.

Rehab & Release

SOAR provides care for well over 200 birds each year that have been injured or orphaned, primarily from western Iowa. Most injuries are the result of human activities: collisions with cars, windows, power lines, fences, mowers, and effects from pesticides. Other injuries occur from storm damage causing nests to fall or birds to be blown into immovable objects.

With every rehabilitated bird, the key to a release site is appropriate habitat for that bird! We want to give these birds every chance at continued success, so we will not release right before a winter storm or during one of Iowa's blazing hot spells. Most releases are subdued and low-key.

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Education

SOAR's goal is to return all birds to the wild. However, once healed, not all birds are able to survive in the wild and be released because of limitations in their vision or ability to fly. These birds may become part of the 'education ambassador team' here at SOAR.

SOAR provides educational programs featuring their non-releasable birds of prey throughout Iowa thanks to our network of experienced environmental educators. Live bird presentations are effective educational tools that make lasting impressions on any audience.

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Research

As SOAR works to rehabilitate injured and sick birds, data is collected that helps with ongoing research and management practices. Conducting research on patients helps: to prevent future mortality, improve rehabilitation techniques, and can help wildlife biologists identify otherwise hard to detect threats to wildlife populations.

Current research includes collecting data on all eagle admits. Data includes reason for admission, injuries, a blood or liver lead level, an x-ray, and final status.

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I’ve found a baby…

“Stuff” happens and sometimes the wildlife parents and young become separated — sometimes this is normal — but how do you know.  Check out these links to learn more! Sometimes we find birds that are not babies – What should I do if I find an injured raptor in Iowa? Learn more about Raptor Rehabilitation Contact your

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Juvenile bald eagles ready for release

Juvenile Bald Eagles Released 10 April 2016!

Remember the crazy week in September 2015 with multiple bald eagles being admitted with injuries consistent with having collided with a vehicle? Two of those bald eagles were released on 10 April 2016 at the O’Brien County Conservation Prairie Heritage Center! This county area is an absolutely beautiful prairie / river habitat. The little Sioux

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Happy Hatchaversary

If you’ve followed SOAR for any length of time, you’ve come to know that ‘busy’ is what we all are! When you’re busy, often projects take way longer than you’d like. I can’t imagine how excruciating the wait is for you all reading this post! (Think about the last remodeling project on your house and

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The madness continues…

As of 15 March 2016, SOAR has admitted 14 bald eagles. Here are some sobering details about these eagles: 5 were DOA (dead on arrival) and 3 died within 24 hours of admit; these eagles were essentially dead when rescued 4 had fatal levels of lead, one with background levels of lead, and 3 are

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Another Conservation Board Approves use of Lead-free Shot and Tackle in Areas

Press release from the Pottawattamie County Conservation Board: “The Pottawattamie County Conservation Board will be requiring the use of non-toxic shot and tackle on its hunting & fishing areas within Pottawattamie County beginning in 2016. As national concerns and potential impacts from lead poisoning are becoming more common the county conservation board has decided to

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Time on the Bow Perch

Terrie spent Saturday 20 February 2016 at SOAR helping with many tasks! Decorah also had practice stepping to Kay’s fist, maintaining balance while Kay walked to the bow perch, and practice stepping from glove to the perch.   Part of Terrie’s day was sitting with Decorah while he was on his bow perch! Two reasons

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Absolutely maddening!

In just over two months time, six bald eagles have been admitted to SOAR. One juvenile female and one adult were DOA (dead on arrival), the adult just last evening and as of right now, unsure of gender. The other four died in our care from the effects of extremely high blood lead levels. Four

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