Saving Our Avian Resources (SOAR) is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1999 dedicated to saving our avian resources through raptor rehabilitation, education, and research. SOAR maintains all necessary US Fish & Wildlife Service and Iowa DNR permits to provide the rehabilitation and education.

Rehab & Release

SOAR provides care for well over 300 birds each year that have been injured or orphaned, primarily from western Iowa.

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Education

SOAR provides educational programs with non-releasable birds of prey through out Iowa., based on your educational needs and goals.

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Research

Data collected helps with ongoing research to improve rehab techniques, prevent future mortality, and to detect threats to wildlife populations.

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non-lead ammo required

New resources

Many thanks to our colleagues with the Fish & Wildlife Service for producing this new handout! Please share with family and friends who hunt (and fish). Deer Hunting & Lead: Be part of the solution! See A Review and Assessment of Spent Lead Ammunition and Its Exposure and Effects to Scavenging Birds in the United

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telemetry unit

Delaware 2 update

After the recent SOAR newsletter went to press, SOAR received one of those email that you don’t like to ever get… from researcher Trish, “Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but I’m almost 100% certain that Delaware 2 is dead. Based on the activity data, she appears to have died on June 25…”

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Thora

Summer happenings at SOAR

Ongoing maintenance is something that every business owner, home owner, and even landowner needs to do! This summer at SOAR, the ‘hawk house’ had new galvanized window screen attached to the exterior of every open window on a flight pen. Why window screen on flight pen windows? We try to give our recovering patients every

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sharp-shinned hawk

Human-made hazards abound

It’s difficult being a wild creature in the human landscape. Dangers lurk around every corner and navigating them is a challenge. Look out your window and you’re likely to see at least a couple hazards for our furred and feathered friends, in fact your window could be a hazard. SOAR admits most patients because of

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young barred owl

Sometimes young birds do need help

SOAR has already admitted three young great horned owls this spring 2017 – both hatchling and brancher! Yes, it is always best if the raptor parent(s) raise their young. Knowing when to intervene is difficult. Many patients admitted in the spring and even into the summer are still considered nestlings (hatchlings) and they should still

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Decorah June 2016

Decorah’s 3rd Hatchaversary

Oh my, how time does fly! Seems like we were all reflecting upon a new year to come and now the calendar says April. Recall that one “little birdie” had a wish for peace on earth, good wi-fi for all, and something really cool for my hatchaversary! The “something really cool” would help all eagle

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Decorah

Eagle News

Many eagle nests across the Midwest already have downy-covered eaglets being attended to by adults. Other nests, have folks on “hatch watch.” That is true at the eagle nest near me and those monitored by our friends at Raptor Resource Project. As of early on the 31st March, two eggs have hatched at Decorah North

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telemetry unit

Releases to help with research

Two bald eagles ready for release were fit with current technology telemetry units on 28 February 2017. These eagles are now part of an eagle tracking study that began in 2014, being jointly conducted with the US Fish & Wildlife Service Moline Field Office, the US Geological Survey, and West Virginia University. The researchers are

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ribbon

Students in Action!

A Lego League Robotics Club from South Sioux City, Nebraska had a task to look for local issues and possible solutions, then present their findings to a group. The club members are all 5th graders this school year. SOAR learned from Woodbury County Conservation naturalist, Theresa Kruid, that they visited the Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center

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Anthon bald eagle

Impacts of lead

With the latest bald eagle admitted 19 December 2016 with HI blood lead levels as measured on our in-house diagnostic equipment, several have asked questions about why, how, and from where do eagles get lead poisoning. How can eagles and other birds get lead in their system? Primary lead exposure in animals is caused by

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