Saving Our Avian Resources (SOAR) is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1999 dedicated to saving our avian resources through raptor rehabilitation, education, and research. SOAR maintains all necessary US Fish & Wildlife Service and Iowa DNR permits to provide the rehabilitation and education.

Rehab & Release

SOAR provides care for well over 300 birds each year that have been injured or orphaned, primarily from western Iowa.

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Education

SOAR provides educational programs with non-releasable birds of prey through out Iowa., based on your educational needs and goals.

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Research

Data collected helps with ongoing research to improve rehab techniques, prevent future mortality, and to detect threats to wildlife populations.

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adult bald eagle

Eleven years of Iowa bald eagle data is published!

Yeah! The research paper is published online in the Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management! Lead Poisoning in Bald Eagles Admitted to Wildlife Rehabilitation Facilities in Iowa, 2004-2014 Thanks need to go to many people… Jodeane (at the Macbride Raptor Project then, now at The RARE Group), Terese and Dr Lori and volunteers with Black

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Bald eagle P-10 released!

SOAR #GivingTuesday 2017

As we approach the end of the calendar year, all of us at SOAR wish to thank our supporters! You help us in immeasurable ways – sharing our website and Facebook posts with others, reading and asking questions about this patient or that education ambassador, you donate money and you send needed supplies so we

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juvenile bald eagle

Bald eagle admits update

After reading website posts and news articles about the number of bald eagles being admitted at wildlife rehabilitation centers and also reading the requests for hunters to go non-toxic in their hunting… we thought it was time to share what’s been going on at SOAR and bald eagle admits. 2017 Through 11/6/2017, SOAR has admitted

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non-lead ammo required

New resources

Many thanks to our colleagues with the Fish & Wildlife Service for producing this new handout! Please share with family and friends who hunt (and fish). Deer Hunting & Lead: Be part of the solution! See A Review and Assessment of Spent Lead Ammunition and Its Exposure and Effects to Scavenging Birds in the United

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telemetry unit

Releases to help with research

Updated Post 24 November 2017 SOAR received word from USFWS that the bald eagle Highlandville was found dead on the side of the road in Clayton County, Iowa. While the reality of his death is not pleasant, and without the telemetry unit and federal band we would never have known his fate. We also would

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juvenile red-tailed hawk

Just say “no!”

Here’s another preventable human hazard for raptors… just say ‘no’ to using rodenticide! While rodenticide certainly does kill rodents, it also one of those toxins that causes secondary poisoning. In other words, rodenticides kill unintended animals. Rodenticides are made from blood thinner. The secondary poisoning happens when another eats a rodent that ate poison made

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telemetry unit

Delaware 2 update

After the recent SOAR newsletter went to press, SOAR received one of those email that you don’t like to ever get… from researcher Trish, “Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but I’m almost 100% certain that Delaware 2 is dead. Based on the activity data, she appears to have died on June 25…”

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Thora

Summer happenings at SOAR

Ongoing maintenance is something that every business owner, home owner, and even landowner needs to do! This summer at SOAR, the ‘hawk house’ had new galvanized window screen attached to the exterior of every open window on a flight pen. Why window screen on flight pen windows? We try to give our recovering patients every

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sharp-shinned hawk

Human-made hazards abound

It’s difficult being a wild creature in the human landscape. Dangers lurk around every corner and navigating them is a challenge. Look out your window and you’re likely to see at least a couple hazards for our furred and feathered friends, in fact your window could be a hazard. SOAR admits most patients because of

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young barred owl

Sometimes young birds do need help

SOAR has already admitted three young great horned owls this spring 2017 – both hatchling and brancher! Yes, it is always best if the raptor parent(s) raise their young. Knowing when to intervene is difficult. Many patients admitted in the spring and even into the summer are still considered nestlings (hatchlings) and they should still

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