Author Archives: SOAR - Linette

Copper!

Make the switch! Watch this segment from Itasca Community TV (Minnesota) of Just Outdoors – Copper Bullets that talks about ballistics, shot placement, human and wildlife health, and three shooting demonstrations. (It’s not short, but is informative!) The Case for Copper: Research uncovers problems with lead bullets for deer hunting Check out this article from

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Position Statements on Lead in Ammunition

Health Risks in Lead-Based Ammunition Scientific experts in lead and environmental health have published both a consensus statement and an editorial encouraging the reduction of lead-based ammunition used with the eventual elimination of lead-based ammunition. Health Risks from Lead-Based Ammunition in the Environment: A Consensus Statement of Scientists (190 KB PDF) Health Risks from Lead-Based

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A bit more about lead poisoning…

The bald eagle admitted on 13 December 2011 that had been caught in a leg-hold trap also had elevated blood lead levels (BLL) of 9.6 µg/dL. She coughed up a pellet (accumulated undigested material, in the case of eagles primarily hair) shortly after initial exam at SOAR. This pellet was x-rayed for lead fragments. The

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Ambassador-in-training Decorah!

Kay has received official word from US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) that the 22 June 2014 juvenile eagle admitted from Decorah, IA / Winneshiek County is no longer being held under Kay’s federal rehabilitation permit, this juvenile eagle has been transferred to Kay’s Live Eagle Exhibition Permit! Decorah will be his name! Now Kay

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Eagle Summer 2014

A perspective from SOAR Executive Director, Kay Neumann 5 September 2014 — Usually summers are relatively quiet here at SOAR; young kestrels and screech owls that need a little food and flight time; the occasional Coopers hawk and window collision, red-tailed hawks and car collisions, baby vultures and hollow tree removal. Well quiet might not

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What happened to SNOW1?

What happened to SNOW1? From Kay… Just like the other 13 snowy owls that SOAR worked with in 2012, SNOW1 came in starving. Seven of the 14 owls died before they got to SOAR’s facility. Five more died despite our best efforts at rehydrating, warming, and trying to reverse their severe starvation. Most had lost

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