Saving Our Avian Resources (SOAR) is a 501(c)(3) organization established in 1999 dedicated to saving our avian resources through raptor rehabilitation, education, and research. SOAR maintains all necessary US Fish & Wildlife Service and Iowa DNR permits to provide the rehabilitation and education.

Rehab & Release

SOAR provides care for well over 300 birds each year that have been injured or orphaned, primarily from western Iowa.

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Education

SOAR provides educational programs with non-releasable birds of prey through out Iowa., based on your educational needs and goals.

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Research

Data collected helps with ongoing research to improve rehab techniques, prevent future mortality, and to detect threats to wildlife populations.

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18 September 2015 – new mew

Kay reports that Decorah is still doing a fairly normal molt. His two favorite places to perch are on a stump and the bow perch. As mentioned in the┬áSpring 2015 newsletter we have plans for renovating one of the 10’x20′ flight pens in the hawk building for Decorah. Before those renovations can begin… a new

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2015 Release Party

30 August 2015 at Dale Valley Vineyard SOAR is having a typical rehab year… but on a more personal note, we’ve had some lows this year. Kay’s friend (and SOAR’s go-to-handyman) Colton Pulver lost his life in a car accident at the end of June. Kay, SOAR, and ‘raptor nation’ lost a friend, advocate, and

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Encourage steel / non-toxic shot for dove hunting

Dove hunting season starts on 1 September here in Iowa and runs through 9 November 2015. Please encourage hunters to use steel shot. Research shows that, when lead shot is used for dove hunting, as many doves die from ingesting lead and lead poisoning as are harvested (3% of the population). Approximately, 17 million doves

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9 August 2015 – Chitters

No news is good news! Several have asked on the progress of tail feathers and how training is going. Decorah continues to be in a low-stress time in training. He has left his jesses and anklets alone (knock on wood he continues this, as many education birds take off their “jewelry”). He’s eating, preening, bathing,

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Considering the switch: Challenges of transitioning to non-lead hunting ammunition

Published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, July 2014. Abstract: In this issue of The Condor: Ornithological Applications, Haig et al. (2014) summarize negative impacts of lead ammunition and fishing tackle on birds and discuss strategies for mitigating risks to wildlife and human health. Their Review raises an important set of questions for hunters, wildlife managers,

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7 July 2015 – feathers

Several have asked about tail feather progress… Kay is maintaining Decorah’s low-stress conditions to give his tail feathers the best opportunity to grow in all the way. Kay reports that none of the feathers have pinched off, but in an effort to keep his stress low she has not checked on tail feather growth. In

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I’ve lost count…

Webmaster has lost count on the number of screech owl hatchlings admitted, however the database says that 18 hatch-year 2015 screech owls have been admitted through early June. Most are in the flight pen.